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HIGHLIGHTED STORIES: New Orleans Passes A Smoke Free Ordinance

23 Apr

tobacco-ban

New Orleans has joined almost 700 cities nationwide in going smoke-free. In January 2015, the New Orleans City Council unanimously passed and Mayor Landrieu signed into law a new, comprehensive smoke-free ordinance. The City’s new ordinance goes into effect on April 22, 2015.  In addition to smoking restrictions that already exist under state law, there will be new restrictions on smoking and vaping (use of electronic smoking devices) in many locations across the City.

Read more here: https://www.nola.gov/smokefree/

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Highlighted Stories: Just Released – New 4th Edition of the Women of Color Health Data Book from the the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH)

1 Apr

The NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) is pleased to announce the publication of the Women of Color Health Data Book, 4th Edition.

The Women of Color Health Information Collection presents data on race/ethnicity and disease. Through data, clues about how culture, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic background, and geographic location contribute to the health status of women of color can be identified. In order to explore sex differences, scientists need data about the similarities and differences between women and men in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other conditions.

Learn more about women of color and their unique health needs, and how the Women of Color Health Data Book, 4th Edition, can assist clinicians in providing person-centered care for diverse populations of women. Please be sure to check out the Data Book, pull-out Data Book collections on breast cancer and HIV/AIDS, and a podcast from the Academy of Women’s Health. Also visit ORWH Director Dr. Janine Clayton’s blog for a commentary introducing the Data Book.

For more information on women’s health, visit the NLM Women’s Health Resources website.

Created in a partnership between the National Library of Medicine Outreach and Special Populations Branch and the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women’s Health, this page presents topics pertaining to women’s health collected to support the mission of the Office of Research on Women’s Health to promote research in the field.

HIGHLIGHTED STORIES: WHO Approves Breakthrough 15-minute Ebola Test

2 Mar

WHO Approves Breakthrough 15-minute Ebola Test

 

The World Health Organization has approved the first rapid test for Ebola in a potential breakthrough for ending an epidemic that has killed almost 10,000 people in West Africa, it said on Friday. The test, developed by U.S.firm Corgenix Medical Corp, is less accurate than the standard test but is easy to perform, does not require electricity, and can give results within 15 minutes, WHO spokesman Tarik Jasarevic said.   Source:http://www.reuters.com

 

HIGHLIGHTED STORIES: People of Color Are Already Getting Hit the Hardest by Climate Change

25 Feb
Sixty-eight percent of African-Americans live within thirty miles of a coal-fired power plant, the zone of maximum exposure to pollutants that cause an array of ailments, from heart disease to birth defects.  Communities of color breathe in nearly 40 percent more polluted air than whites.  African-American children are three times as likely to suffer an asthma attack.  The NAACP launched its Climate Justice Initiative address the stark numbers head on.

More information here: http://m.thenation.com/blog/179407-people-color-are-already-getting-hit-hardest-climate-change

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HIGHLIGHTED STORIES: Discrimination is bad for your health-and your kids too

25 Feb

discrimination

There is no shortage of evidence that racism persists.  Despite the fact that science has demonstrated that racial groups are defined by society rather than biology, an individual’s experience from the moment they are born is colored by the color of their skin.  Recently, high profile incidents have focused attention on how people can be treated differently by authority figures.  However the majority of discrimination experiences are much more subtle.  In fact, subtle bias may actually be more mentally damaging than overt bias.  Subtle bias is able to “get under the skin” to influence physical health.

More information here:  http://theconversation.com/discrimination-is-bad-for-your-health-and-your-kids-too-36054

Highlighted Stories: Mental Health Treatment in the US

5 Dec

Los Angeles Times – 7.6% of Americans are depressed, but few seek mental health treatment
About 1 in 13 Americans was suffering from depression at some point between 2009 and 2012, yet only 35% of people with severe depression and 20% of those with moderate depression said they had sought help from a mental health professional, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
That’s troubling, the report authors write, because therapy combined with medication is “the most effective treatment for depression, especially for severe depression.” Drugs might be prescribed by a primary care doctor, but only a mental health specialist would conduct the type of therapy needed to get well.mental health

Highlighted Stories: People’s Climate March

16 Aug

Climate change

Public health news
People’s Climate March
On Sept. 21, world leaders will be in New York City for a UN Summit to discuss climate change. This is our opportunity to mobilize and let these individuals know the importance of developing solutions to address the impact climate change is having on the health of people and the environment.

If you are interested in supporting this cause, register to attend the People’s Climate March by visiting http://www.peoplesclimate.org/march/ . For volunteering opportunities, please click here. If you are unable to come to New York City, you can still be an agent of change by participating in the Global Day of Action. To register, please visit http://www.peoplesclimate.org/global/.