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SAAPHI Scientific Committee Student Travel Award

27 Aug

usa-travel

Purpose
RWJ New Connections in collaboration with the SAAPHI Scientific Committee are offering Student Travel Award to encourage and enable students to attend the SAAPHI Pre-Conference Meeting being held on Saturday, November 15th, 2014 in New Orleans, LA prior to the APHA conference. The travel award is intended to support the attendance of student members of SAAPHI, to further their understanding of health disparities and epidemiologic issues as they relate to the African diaspora and the given conference theme “Healthography: The Relationships of Place and Health in the African Diaspora”. The awards committee will give substantial weight to the depth of the applicant’s role at the pre-conference meeting (presenter, attendee), the academic standing of the applicant, and the applicant’s professional goals as they relate to the mission of SAAPHI.

Number of awards
Five $500 travel grants will be awarded on a reimbursable basis upon submission of documents after the conference.

Eligibility Requirements
● The applicant must be a student enrolled full or part-time (minimum of 6 credit hours) who is actively pursuing a health-related degree
● The applicant must be a junior, senior, or graduate student (Masters or Doctoral) in a public health or other health-related program
● Recipients of other external travel awards/grants are not eligible (e.g. F31, T32)
● The applicant must be eligible for Robert Wood Johnson New Connections network membership
○ Doctoral students (completing their final year of study), postdoctoral fellows, junior faculty members with a PhD or junior-level researchers working in the public of private sectors
○ Members of ethnic or racial minority or low-income communities and/or first in their family to receive a college degree
● Recipients must be members of SAAPHI.
○ To become a member of SAAPHI http://www.saaphi.org. Click on Contact and select Membership

Application Instructions
Please send an electronic copy of all application materials as a single PDF file, collated in the order below to the SAAPHI Scientific Committee at saaphiscientific@gmail.com.
● Please specify Student Travel Award Application in the subject line preceded by your last name (Jones_StudentTravelAwardApplication).
● Resume or CV
● A personal statement (500 word maximum) that includes the following information:
○ Description of your reasons for attending the SAAPHI Pre-Conference Meeting.
○ Discussion of your plans to utilize the experience during the conference to further your professional development and public health research/practice.
● A reference letter from either the department chair or academic advisor attesting to the your commitment to public health research and practice.

Deadline
The deadline for submission of all materials to SAAPHI is September 26, 2014.

Selection Process
Members of the SAAPHI Scientific Committee will select the recipients via a competitive review process. Applicants will be notified by email of the award decision by October 3, 2014.

SAAPHI Scientific Committee Dissertation Award

23 Aug

 

Purpose

To provide funding and recognition to outstanding doctoral students who are in public health or other health-related fields and a demonstrated interest in contributing to the field of health disparities research as evidenced by a dissertation topic of relevance to people of the African diaspora.

Number of awards

Three $300 dissertation awards will be granted.

Eligibility Requirements

● The applicant must be a student enrolled either full or part-time (for a minimum 6 of credit hours) who is actively pursuing a doctoral degree in public health or other health-related field
● The applicant must have successfully defended the dissertation proposal and have received written approval to begin dissertation research
● The topic of the dissertation must be related to the mission of SAAPHI which is to:
○ To initiate and assist in the improvement, development, maintenance, and utilization of appropriate databases for the understanding of health problems and needs of African American communities;

○ To promote the utilization of scientific information on African Americans in program and policy decisions; and
○ To formulate and advocate appropriate public policies for health promotion and disease prevention among African Americans.
● Recipients of other external grants are not eligible (e.g. F31, T32)

Application Instructions

Please send an electronic copy of all application materials as a single PDF file, collated in the order below to the SAAPHI Scientific Committee to saaphiscientific@gmail.com.

● Resume or CV

● A descriptive summary of the dissertation research and significant aspects of the work, suitable for an audience of educated lay people (500 words maximum).

● A budget or detailed description for the use of the funds

● A reference letter from a thesis or dissertation advisor evaluating the merits of the proposed project and discussing the contributions of the student to his/her field (i.e., presentations, papers, awards, or other evidence of scholarly superiority), and a statement confirming that the students dissertation approval has been approved.

Deadline

The deadline for submission of all materials to SAAPHI is September 26, 2014.

SAAPHI Abstract Writing Guide

30 Oct

 

Definition

 The writer should think of an abstract as a “marketing document”, in that its primary purpose is to summarize work that has been proposed or completed and capture the reader’s interest. It is a short document, typically comprised of 100 – 500 words that should be written in a concise manner. The components of the abstract will vary according to discipline. Further, a poorly written abstract discourages readers from taking the time to read through the document in its entirety.

There are many types of abstracts, including those used in journal publications, conference abstracts, as well as a prospectus or research proposal. Abstracts in journal publications usually precede the entire text of a peer-reviewed journal. This type of abstract is often readily available and is listed in search databases such as PUBMED, Medline, Ovid, Medscape, etc. Another type of abstract is a conference abstract. This abstract is used to propose paper topics, poster presentations, panel sessions, or oral presentations at a professional conference.

 

Beginning the Writing Process

When responding to a Call for Abstracts or Call for Papers, the writer should initially consider the intended audience and the submission guidelines. The intended audience is likely a review committee that may have to review many submissions and, for this reason, you have to ensure that your abstract will be able to stand out. However, do not forget your secondary audience. The secondary audience consists of those who will attend or are considering attending the conference. You want to be sure that, upon approval, your abstract will be enticing enough for them to join your presentation.

Next, decide upon a Problem Statement that will clearly explain the importance of the proposed research topic. This statement, which may be reflected in the title, should form the basis of the overall abstract and inform the reader of the information in the larger work. The statement should specify what practical, scientific, or theoretical gap your research is fulfilling. In other words, the problem statement should define the scope of the project.

General Components of an Abstract

Always review the specific guidelines of a particular journal or professional organization as abstract components may vary by discipline. The most basic “structured” abstract will likely consist of the following components:

Introduction/Objectives

This section should begin with an opening statement that contains 1 – 2 sentences and clearly explains the overarching purpose of the study, project, or program as well as the specific aims.

 Methodology

Specific models and approaches should be addressed. In addition, the writer should provide an overview of the methods used to gather data, develop and execute a project, or operate a program. In the most simplistic terms, explain what you did and how you did it. Include details about how the data was collected and analyzed.

Results

Concisely summarize your main findings or outcomes. An abstract may include specific data or discuss critical findings in a more general way. Be sure to clearly state what was discovered, learned, or created.

Conclusions

The conclusion should consist of a brief discussion that imparts the significance of the results and discusses what they mean? Describe the implications, including for the problem or topic that was initially identified in the Introduction? Inform the reader as to how the research adds to the body of knowledge on a topic.

Additional headings may include:

  • Background
  • Specific Aims
  • Design
  • Participants
  • Intervention (Method)
  • Interpretation

Again, be sure to check what are specified in the formal Call for Abstracts/Papers.

Additional Tips

 State the topic within the first sentence, no later than the second sentence of the abstract.

  • Limit the length of the title to no more than 12 words (or what is stated in the guidelines).
  • Avoid using the first person “I” or “we” when possible.
  • Write in the past tense.
  • Choose active verbs instead of passive ones (ex: “the study tested” instead of “In the study we tested”).
  • Avoid jargon, trade names, acronyms, abbreviations, & symbols in your abstract, because your explanation of these names will take up valuable room/words.
  • Check your spelling and grammar, and be sure to provide logical connections/transitions between information in the abstract.
  • Review and edit!
  • Identify and include at least 5 key words to accompany the abstract.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows Program Announces Call for Applications

24 Sep

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows Program Announces Call for Applications

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows program is designed to provide a comprehensive fellowship experience at the nexus of health science, policy, and politics in Washington, D.C.

The program provides an outstanding opportunity for exceptional midcareer health professionals and behavioral and social scientists with an interest in health and healthcare policy. Fellows participate in the policy process at the federal level and use that leadership experience to improve health, health care, and health policy.

Exceptional candidates from academic faculties and nonprofit healthcare organizations are encouraged to apply. Applicants may have backgrounds in the disciplines of allied health, biomedical sciences, dentistry, economics or other social sciences, health services organization and administration, medicine, nursing, public health, social and behavioral health, or health law. Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.

Up to six grants of up to $165,000 will be made in 2014. Each fellow will receive up to $94,000 for the Washington stay (September 1, 2014, through August 31, 2015) in salary, plus fringe benefits or a fellowship stipend.

The complete call for applications and application instructions are available at the RWJF Web site.

The deadline is November 13, 2013.

For more information: http://www.rwjf.org/cfp/hpf5?cid=XEM_A7545

Grant Writing Session

3 May

By: Denise A. Smith, MPH

Each year between the months of January through March, governmental agencies and organizations post grant funding announcements for those seeking programmatic funding within the public health sector. In order for public health organizations to thrive, grant monies are vital to the sustainability of the organization and its ability to serve individual, community and population health initiatives. We find that state, local and non-governmental organizations all seek the same funding sources.

What can we do differently to make sure our underserved and minority communities get the funding needed? Are we looking in the right places?

Everyone relies on grants.gov to find funding, but few look to big businesses such as Wal-Mart, Pepsi Cola, Coca-Cola, Frito-Lay and other companies for resources. These companies are in our backyards promoting their products and many are mandated to donate money to various causes. We need to tap into these resources for funding, as well as sponsorship and donations in order to achieve our collective goals.

Listed are various links that can assist with finding resources for organizations that serve minority and underserved communities.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: http://www.grants.gov

The Office of Minority Health: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=2

Coca-Cola: http://www.coca-colacompany.com/our-company/community-requests-guidelines-application

PepsiCo: http://www.pepsicenter.com/kse/company/sponsorship-opportunities/ or contact your local bottling company with a letter of intent

Target: http://pressroom.target.com/faq/sponsorship

Walgreens: http://www.walgreens.com/marketing/about/community/guidelines.jsp

Wal-Mart Supermarket: http://foundation.walmart.com/