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SAAPHI Scientific Committee Dissertation Award

23 Aug

 

Purpose

To provide funding and recognition to outstanding doctoral students who are in public health or other health-related fields and a demonstrated interest in contributing to the field of health disparities research as evidenced by a dissertation topic of relevance to people of the African diaspora.

Number of awards

Three $300 dissertation awards will be granted.

Eligibility Requirements

● The applicant must be a student enrolled either full or part-time (for a minimum 6 of credit hours) who is actively pursuing a doctoral degree in public health or other health-related field
● The applicant must have successfully defended the dissertation proposal and have received written approval to begin dissertation research
● The topic of the dissertation must be related to the mission of SAAPHI which is to:
○ To initiate and assist in the improvement, development, maintenance, and utilization of appropriate databases for the understanding of health problems and needs of African American communities;

○ To promote the utilization of scientific information on African Americans in program and policy decisions; and
○ To formulate and advocate appropriate public policies for health promotion and disease prevention among African Americans.
● Recipients of other external grants are not eligible (e.g. F31, T32)

Application Instructions

Please send an electronic copy of all application materials as a single PDF file, collated in the order below to the SAAPHI Scientific Committee to saaphiscientific@gmail.com.

● Resume or CV

● A descriptive summary of the dissertation research and significant aspects of the work, suitable for an audience of educated lay people (500 words maximum).

● A budget or detailed description for the use of the funds

● A reference letter from a thesis or dissertation advisor evaluating the merits of the proposed project and discussing the contributions of the student to his/her field (i.e., presentations, papers, awards, or other evidence of scholarly superiority), and a statement confirming that the students dissertation approval has been approved.

Deadline

The deadline for submission of all materials to SAAPHI is September 26, 2014.

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SAAPHI Scientific Committee Dissertation Award

17 Jul

Purpose
To provide funding and recognition to outstanding doctoral students who are in public health or other health-related fields and a demonstrated interest in contributing to the field of health disparities research as evidenced by a dissertation topic of relevance to people of the African diaspora.

Number of awards
Three $300 dissertation awards will be granted.

Eligibility Requirements
The applicant must be a student enrolled either full or part-time (for a minimum 6 of credit hours) who is actively pursuing a doctoral degree in public health or other health-related field

The applicant must have successfully defended the dissertation proposal and have received written approval to begin dissertation research

The topic of the dissertation must be related to the mission of SAAPHI which is to:
To initiate and assist in the improvement, development, maintenance, and utilization of appropriate databases for the understanding of health problems and needs of African American communities;
To promote the utilization of scientific information on African Americans in program and policy decisions; and
To formulate and advocate appropriate public policies for health promotion and disease prevention among African Americans.
Recipients of other external grants are not eligible (e.g. F31, T32)

Application Instructions

Please send an electronic copy of all application materials as a single PDF file, collated in the order below to the SAAPHI Scientific Committee to saaphiscientific@gmail.com.

Resume or CV
A descriptive summary of the dissertation research and significant aspects of the work, suitable for an audience of educated lay people (500 words maximum).

A budget or detailed description for the use of the funds

A reference letter from a thesis or dissertation advisor evaluating the merits of the proposed project and discussing the contributions of the student to his/her field (i.e., presentations, papers, awards, or other evidence of scholarly superiority), and a statement confirming that the students dissertation approval has been approved.

Deadline
The deadline for submission of all materials to SAAPHI is September 26, 2014.

Selection Process

Members of the SAAPHI Scientific Committee will select the recipients via a competitive review process.

DissertationApplicants will be notified by email of the award decision by October 3, 2014.

Focusing on Minority Health Research

21 Jun

ImageEvery student has to grapple with deciding upon a suitable, interesting, and relevant Capstone project, thesis, or dissertation. The most common advice that many receive when facing this dilemma, is that they select a topic that they are most passionate about, and one that they already have a certain degree of knowledge about. For many minority, or “marginalized majority” students, the outcome is that they often choose topics that are focused on their own particular racial and/or ethnic group; and this is occasionally met with disdain or disapproval. Nevertheless, focused research, and the supportive efforts of organizations such as the Society for the Analysis of African American Public Health Issues (SAAPHI), which looks at populations of African descent, including African American, African, Afro-Latino, and Afro-Caribbean; are indeed important and necessary.

Students and even early career professionals involved in research simply need to ask themselves, “If I don’t conduct the needed research, who will?” Meaning, if members of these minority groups do not take an interest in topics that greatly and disproportionately affect their racial/ethnic group, then it is highly unlikely that these groups will not be represented in the collected data and research process as a whole. In other words, without their focused lens of analysis, these populations would lack adequate representation, and the inequities and disparities that plague them would go unidentified and even more importantly unaddressed. Analysis carried out by researchers who are also members of the “subject” population serves as a means to draw attention to the needs of these sub-populations, and in terms of public health, helps to ensure that these community members are given a voice.

In addition, another benefit is that these researchers are peer experts, who understand the cultural and social norms of these respective minority groups, and who may be able to better to successfully bridge the gap of mistrust of the medical and health establishment; that these sub-populations harbor. Overall, students should not feel as if their work is diminished if they choose to focus on minority groups that they are members of and are familiar with. Their basic level of knowledge about these communities will actually serve as a benefit.

Cherise Charleswell, MPH

SAAPHI Governing Board

ANNOUNCEMENT: PARTICIPANTS NEEDED FOR DISSERTATION RESEARCH

29 May

Dear SAAPHI Members:

 

Initially, I hope this message finds you well. In light of the recent presidential proclamation for April to be observed as National Cancer Control Month, how are you supporting national efforts to prevent cancer? As a doctoral candidate in Health Education at Texas A&M University, I am currently conducting my dissertation research, which seeks to advance understanding of the intersection of male role norms, knowledge, attitudes, and intentions to screen for colorectal cancer (CRC) among young adult African-American men (TAMU IRB2013-0088).

 

**Why should I care about this research?** The playing field is not even as it relates to deaths from colorectal cancer for African-American men. There is a critical need for exploring the poorly understood, complex factors that may shape intentions to screen for CRC among men who are younger than those traditionally assessed by health promotion researchers and clinicians (i.e., African-American men, ages 19-45). Ultimately, my proposed research will contribute to solutions that eliminate disparities in health, cancer, and healthcare, moving closer to the long term goal of achieving health equity for all in the U.S.

 

**Am I qualified to participate?** If you are an African-American male between 19 and 45 years old living in the U.S., then you are qualified to participate by completing a survey at www.ChangeThaGame.com. It will take approximately 30 minutes of your time.

**How can I help if I’m not qualified to participate?** Spread the word via email, word of mouth, text message, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.!

**Will participants be considered for any incentives?** Absolutely! Those who complete the survey can choose to be considered for 1 of 4 incentives:

     (1) Google Nexus 7 tablet valued at approximately $200,

     (2) Beats by Dre PowerBeats In-Ear Headphones valued at approximately $140,

     (3) Amazon Kindle Fire valued at approximately $110, or

     (4) Apple TV with 1080p valued at approximately $100.

**Who should I contact for more information/questions?** Contact me, Charles R. Rogers, MSAS, at:crrogers2@tamu.edu or 919-438-24